Can Chickens Eat Strawberry? – Know Before Feeding

Can chickens eat strawberry? Lets find out the real fact. Chickens are some of the luckiest creatures on the planet because of their surprisingly varied diet.

They can eat almost anything you and the ground offer, including meat, grains, vegetables, disgusting worms and more. For them, food is a never-ending buffet.

Can chickens eat strawberries? Yes, chickens do love feeding on this tasty treat. If you are wondering what to do with your leftover strawberries, you can include them in your chickens’ diet. Aside from the few health benefits, they help keep your chickens happy and thriving.

However, it is a good idea to feed your chickens strawberries sparingly. Feeding them too much of these berries may interfere with their metabolism due to their high sugar concentration.

Let’s dive into how strawberries can benefit your flock of chickens and what parts of this fruit they can take.

Health Benefits of Strawberry to Chickens

If your chickens love strawberries, here are the health benefits they get from this sweet fruit.

Strawberries are rich in nutrients

Strawberries are rich in nutrients, including plenty of antioxidants and vitamin C and B9 that benefit the human body and your chicken as well. Let’s see how these nutrients help your chicken.

Fiber content

Strawberries are abundant in soluble and insoluble fiber, making up 26% of the fruit’s content. A single serving will have your chicken consuming at least 2 grams of fiber. This nutrient is essential for your chickens’ digestion.

Healthy bacteria in a chicken’s stomach feed on fiber, improving their gastrointestinal health. Fiber also plays a significant role in weight loss among these birds and helps prevent other diseases.

Carbohydrate content

Strawberries contain minimal carbohydrates. They are ideal for your chickens, as too much of this content may lead to reduced egg production, protein intake, and obesity.

Also, the carbohydrates in strawberries come in the form of natural sugars, which are healthy for any bird. However, always remember to serve them strawberries in small amounts.

Mineral and vitamin content

Vitamins and minerals are the building blocks your feathered friends need to remain strong and healthy.

Luckily, strawberries contain these two nutrients in plenty. Vitamin C, like for us, is a potent antioxidant that helps improve a chicken’s immunity.

Vitamin B9, on the other hand, helps in healthy tissue development for chickens. Strawberries also contain manganese, potassium, copper, iron, phosphorus, magnesium, and vitamins B6, E, and K, all vital for chickens’ bodily functions.

Strawberries can also help cure your chickens’ blues

Chickens are foragers by nature. They spend their whole day pecking on the ground, looking for something new and delicious to feed on.

Offering them a few strawberries may help bring back the energy they have been missing and the sweet taste, which keeps them happy.

Parts of Strawberry Plants Chickens can Eat

Parts of Strawberry Plants Chickens can Eat
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Do chickens like strawberries? Try throwing a few around them to get your answer from how they react.

Like humans, some may like them while others may not, but most chickens love the fruit and will jump on them as soon as they touch the ground.

Here are some parts of the strawberry plant that your chickens can enjoy and how they affect them.

Strawberry tops

Strawberry tops are not healthy for your chicken. Avoid giving your chickens the green bit on the top of strawberries, known as strawberry calyxes. They may have been contaminated by pesticides used to grow the fruit.

Strawberry leaves

When strawberries are picked, they release a toxin known as hydrogen cyanide into the leaves.

This toxin is quite dangerous for a chicken’s digestion and egg production. However, chickens can feed on dried-up strawberry leaves with no adverse effects.

Strawberry stems

Strawberry stems are almost always together with the leaves. When hydrogen cyanide is released into the leaves, it also flows to the stem.

The good thing is that the effects of this toxin will only manifest if you give your chicken too many strawberry stems and leaves.

Strawberry fruit

Chickens absolutely love the strawberry fruit. You should, however, limit your chickens’ consumption of sugary snacks. Despite the health benefits strawberries offer, their sugar content can pose a health risk.

Your feathered flock is not as good at digesting sugar, unlike humans. Too much of it makes them unhealthy.

Can Chicks Eat Strawberries?

Now that we have answered the question, “Can chickens eat strawberries” let’s find out if chicks can eat them as well.

Chicks, too, can enjoy this tasty treat and its benefits. You can chop them finely or squash them up to make it easy for the tiny creatures to feed on. Also, ensure you only give chicks on soft and ripe strawberries.

FAQs

Can chickens eat store-bought strawberries?

Yes, they do. After making your dessert, feed them leftover store-bought strawberries, and they will enjoy the treat.

What happens if chickens eat moldy strawberries?

Just like in humans, mold is not healthy for your feathered flock. Moldy strawberries will get them sick, and may also cause skin issues when they come into contact with the mold.

Can chickens eat strawberry hulls?

Yes, chickens can eat strawberry hulls, but they harm a chicken’s digestive system. The calyx, leaves, and stems contain toxins.

Conclusion

You can feed your chickens strawberries at any time of the day, but always be watchful to avoid throwing them the toxic parts. Cold strawberries are ideal for a hot day as they help regulate their body temperature and contain healthy water.

So, can chickens eat strawberries? Like we have discussed, yes, they can. However, only feed them these tasty fruits in moderation, as with any other fruit.

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I am Bijaya Kumar and I have been raising chickens for the last 10 years. Backyard poultry farming has been our family business for the last 30 years. We raise multiple chicken breeds in their backyard.

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